Writing Fantasy Religions

Write Fantasy Religions

“I pray to the four winds… and you?”

– Conan the Barbarian, 1982

Writing stories involving fantasy religions is fun and for some folks tricky. Religion is a large part of the human experience, and you lose some great story potential if you choose to omit religion from your world.

This post is not about the deities themselves. Great stories are about conflict and the darker side of human nature, so with that in mind, let’s proceed with some basic design choices, then get into the juicy bits with followers, dogmas, sin, heresy, redemption, and crusades.

Design Choices

You have a couple of things to consider when you design your deity, pantheon or pantheons.

  • Monotheism or polytheism?
  • Regional or world-spanning religions?
  • Alignments or morally ambiguous?
  • Cosmology.
  • Great Old Ones?

Monotheism

Monotheism is the belief in one god – possibly an all-knowing and all-powerful creator of the world.

Monotheistic religion is both an efficient and compelling way to set up faith in your fantasy setting.

It is efficient because you only have this one religion to develop and is easy for the audience to keep up.

Monotheism is compelling because of its current day parallels. Familiarity gives social commentaries and political satire more significant impact. You can also draw on modern-day conflicts for your setting, which will help you create meaningful stories, albeit at the danger of hitting too close to home.

Polytheism

Polytheism is the belief in many gods. Creating a polytheistic pantheon has the advantages of plenty of great real-life myths to draw on, and you are less likely to insult any of your audience.

If you choose polytheism, is there more than one pantheon? Is the split regional or racial?

Choose the number of deities and pantheons carefully because you will potentially have a lot of design work ahead of you, and you may have invited more detail than you want.

You also need to determine if the deities are equally compelling. What gives them power, just worship or is fear sufficient?

World Spanning or Regional Religions

You have to choose if your world has world-spanning or local religions as your world grows. Both approaches have advantages and disadvantages.

World-spanning religions are great for large-scale conflicts. Imagine the power centers of world religions, with all its wealth, and economic and social capital.

If you want to deal with big stories and issues, world-spanning churches have a lot to offer. The possibilities for intrigue and adventure has no limit. If you desire high-stakes swashbuckling tale, you can do that. If you wish to morally ambiguous stories of power abuse, you can do that as well. A clear-cut moral tale about defeating evil – or good – is possible.

Keep in mind that world-spanning religions rely on communications. Better roads and sea routes would mean better integration of the church.

A practical advantage of a world-spanning religious is that it requires less design work, at least at first glance. Wherever you go priest, and holy sites should look the same.

The other end of the spectrum is regional or local deities. Local deities mean more design work as the world grow, but it also adds color and distinction to regions on a smaller scale. Smaller also favors more personal conflicts, thus a greater emotional punch.

Cosmology

What is the universe? Is there a multiverse? Heaven and hell? The truth is probably unknown to both audience and characters, hence the word ‘faith,’ but you as a storyteller may want to know the facts.

The Great Old Ones

The Great Old Ones, by H.P. Lovecraft, has been a fantasy trope since Conan hacked to pieces his first Unspeakable Thing way back in the 1930s.

Is the Great Old Ones part of your cosmology? How do they relate to the devils and demons?

Origins, Prophets, Angels, and Demons

“Prophets have a way of dying by violence.” (Frank Herbert, Dune, 1965)

The core of the religion is its origin. Has the deity always existed or is there an origin story? The storyteller needs to pin down the popular version of these events, its main characters, and locations.

Who are the prophets? How and why did the religion rise to prominence? Are there supernatural creatures, and may they appear in your story?

These decisions will affect everything that follows: contested holy sites, rival dogmas, opposing prophets and how the religion seek to shape the world in its image.

Followers

You can begin to work out the details after making the initial design choices listed above. You now know how many churches we are talking about and something about their power. It is time to get to know the churches. What defines a church?

Again we use the method of asking questions as a world-building strategy to get to know a church and its followers.

  • Dogma
  • Organization
  • Holy sites
  • Members
  • Power

Dogmas

The religion’s dogma is the truths the faith holds true. An easy path is to use straightforward faux-catholicism, or you could strive for something elaborate for your world.

Dogma should answer:

  • What is righteous action?
  • Who are the enemies of the faith?
  • What happens when we die?
  • Who has the responsibility to lead?

The path of least resistance is perhaps to establish the first impression, then develop the rest as your story demands. The beauty of layered stories is that first impressions are never correct.

Religious Vestments

How do priests, templars, inquisitors, and followers dress? Do they wear different clothing during sermons and more mundane situations? How do you recognize them? By extension, do they favor certain weapons, and what are the holy symbols of the faith?

Organization

A world-spanning or regional religion will require a significant organization and management. You need to decide whether the religion condones violence and includes an armed branch. Is the church part of society’s power structure, or is it somehow set apart from the establishment?

Branches may include:

  • The clergy: the servants who tend to the believers and advice the rulers.
  • Scholars: places of learning.
  • Intelligence and investigation: inquisitors, informants, and spies.
  • A church army: paladins, templars and regular soldiers.

Management is the stuff of legends, as we all know. Management leads to mismanagement, the rivalry between factions and vendettas. Different factions may have a competing interpretation of the religion’s dogma, and may again lead to infighting and violence.

Holy Sites

The religion’s holy sites are the locations of its origin, the places the divine appeared, and important sites in the religion’s history. Such places are excellent sources of conflict and may also be chess pieces in mundane power politics.

Members

The members of the church are its representatives on Earth. The members are mortals, and as flawed beings, much more interesting than the divine itself.

Power

The storyteller must decide the religions power and willingness to use it.

Troubled Faith

Stories require conflict, and troubled faith offers many compelling plot hooks: sin, heresy, war, and redemption.

Sin

Sin is another exciting option for any aspiring fallen priest. Sin would be breaking the deity’s teachings. To sin is different from heresy as the character knows he or she is doing something that is considered wrong.

The first step of introducing sin into a fictional world is to decide what sin means.

When in doubt you cannot go wrong with the classics: pride, greed, wrath, lust, envy, gluttony and sloth. These sins may work for some deities in your pantheon, for others, the list will require some work.

Heresy

Heretics fits all sorts of roles in a story or game. They are excellent characters, villains, or supporting characters. Characters or organizations struggling with faith have exciting backgrounds and can easily breathe life into your fantasy stories.

Example: The God of Tyranny Offer a Solution

The lands face a dire crisis, and people crave order and safety. Troubled people are sometimes willing to sacrifice freedom and even tolerate the suffering of others to get it. Does that make people evil? What is the greater good? Is there a greater evil out there. This threat could explain why an otherwise good society supports an evil god.

What if the God of Tyranny offers a simple solution to current problems? Let’s say hunger and plague are laying the lands waste. What if the god argues that the elves are to blame for this malady?

If open worship of the God of Tyranny is too offensive, the god could sponsor heretical beliefs within any lawful church. The clergy of good-hearted god twist and corrupt the dogma, in truth turn to darker powers for a quicker solution, thus become heretics. The fallen priest do no realize what has happened, and will deny it, but has in truth turned to a darker god. Therefore the God of Tyranny builds a new church, one fallen priest at the time.

Crusades

Crusades are where the religious strife kicks into high gear with religious wars. You may create a world where this is justifiable. You may have a world where the crusade serve an ulterior motive or both.

  • The enemy religion is evil, and you should destroy it.
  • Your religion has fallen and is, in fact, dooming its followers.
  • Your high priests or sponsor are using the crusade as an excuse to deal with their enemies.
  • The truth is long-lost, and no one knows how the fight started. All you know is that the competing religions are locked in a destructive tit-for-tat.

Redemption

The fallen believer should naturally have a chance of redemption. Fallen faith should be all about drama.

You have at least three options:

  • Pick the worst possible quest you can imagine – slay a demigod or demon lord or something – and give it to the character. It is easy, straightforward and should provide you with plenty of material. The downside is that this will dominate the remainder of the story and likely derails whatever you initially had planned.
  • Reverse the damage. The character must undo the damage caused, and possibly pay penance for the misdeed. It will set back the character‘s advancement, and hopefully, we will learn something about the character. Once completed the story can return to whatever initially planned.
  • Pick something fitting – poetic justice, or something that promotes the current story, yet punishes the character for the misdeeds.

Keep in mind that redemption is a powerful motivation, and is likely to dominate the remainder of the story. It is not a plot device used lightly.

What Do You Think?

Am I missing something? Are religion best kept out of the stories? Please leave a comment below.

Create Fantasy Religions

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The Reading List

Daniel Abraham, perhaps best known for the Expanse, wrote the Dagger and the Coin series, beginning with The Dragon’s Path (2011). The series eventually sets the protagonist Cithrin bel Sarcour against a vile spider cult. The series is excellent, and describe a religious attack on a secular society. The absence of a mainstream or mundane religion to contrast the vile cult is curious, and undoubtedly no accident.

H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos, starting with Dagon (1917) feature gods of sorts: uncaring monster beyond comprehension. Why would anyone care about heresy?

“The Name of the Rose” (1980), by Umberto Eco, is a medieval murder mystery in an abbey with a religious backdrop of conflicting beliefs. For lighter fare, consider the option for the Sean Connery and Christian Slater movie (1986) instead. You get Hellboy as one of the supporting characters as a bonus.

The Malazan stories by Ian Cameron Esslemont and Steven Ericsson (1999 and ongoing), starting with the Gardens of the Moon (1999) or Night of Knives (2004), has its spin on what god-like characters can be. I have to admit after reading most of Ericsson’s series once I still do not get how the ascendants work. The scope of this world is magnificent, and it is certain that the ascendants would not care less about mortal concerns, wrapped up in their games as they are. Please note that the “correct” reading order may not be what you think, although this is debatable.

 

The Malazan Authors’ Suggested Reading Order for the Series Is Not What You Would Expect

 

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